The NHS in Gloucestershire is reassuring everyone who is eligible for a COVID booster or flu vaccination this winter that they will receive an invitation from local NHS services to book a slot soon. Please DO NOT contact GP surgeries at this time.

GPs and community NHS teams across the county are offering the COVID and flu vaccines to people who are most at risk of getting very ill this winter.

Set to start during the week of 5 September, NHS staff will begin vaccinating care home residents and people who are housebound, with invitations being sent to those who are eligible on a phased basis in the coming weeks.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation have confirmed that adults can have their COVID booster and flu vaccination at the same time, so some people may be offered both at the same appointment, subject to supplies.

The following groups are eligible for one or both vaccines:

  • residents in a care home for older adults and staff working in care homes for older adults (COVID booster and flu jab)
  • frontline health and social care workers (COVID booster and flu jab)
  • all adults aged 50 years and over (COVID booster and flu jab)
  • people aged 5 to 49 years with certain health conditions (COVID booster and flu jab)
  • persons aged 5 to 49 years who are household contacts of people with a severely weakened immune system (COVID booster and flu jab)
  • people who receive a carer’s allowance, or are the main carer for an older or disabled person who may be at risk if you get sick (COVID booster and flu jab)
  • pregnant women (COVID booster and flu jab)
  • two- and three-year olds (flu nasal spray)
  • primary school and secondary school pupils up to year 9 (flu nasal spray, delivered via the school vaccination programme).

There are several ways to access winter vaccinations in Gloucestershire:

  • Via appointment at a GP-led primary care network vaccination centre – Please note that these appointments are not available on the national booking system (NBS), people will receive an invite directly from local NHS services to book when it’s their turn. Many people will be invited to the same local vaccination centre where they’ve had previous doses of the COVID vaccine, but in some areas of the county people may be able to book an appointment at their GP surgery. People may be offered their COVID booster and flu jab at the same appointment subject to supplies.
  • Via the national booking system (COVID booster only) – some people may choose to book an appointment at one of 10 community pharmacies across the county using the NBS telephone number and website (www.nhs.uk/covidvaccination or call 119).
  • At a drop-in clinic – Some drop-in clinics may be arranged as the rollout of the vaccination programme advances. Please note, flu vaccines may not be available at all of these clinics, so please check criteria and eligibility before attending.

It isn’t too late for anyone who is eligible for a first, second or booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccination to change their mind and take up the offer.

There are vaccination sites offering COVID vaccinations to those eligible:

  • First or second dose – Children aged 5 to 11 (paediatric dose Pfizer)
  • First or second doses – Children aged 12-15 (Pfizer), anyone aged 16/17 year olds (Pfizer), anyone aged 18+ (Pfizer or Moderna)
  • Third primary dose – Children aged 5-11 who are severely immunocompromised (paediatric dose Pfizer – 8 weeks after second dose), anyone aged 12+ who is severely immunocompromised (Pfizer – 8 weeks after second dose)

*children aged 5-17 inclusive must wait 12 weeks after a COVID-19 infection to get a vaccination

**people aged 18 or over must wait four weeks after a COVID-19 infection to get a vaccination

To access a vaccination just follow the instructions in your original invitation from local GP services, use the national booking system to get an appointment at a community pharmacy or the JabVan at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital (www.nhs.uk/covidvaccination or call 119), or look out for drop-in clinics below.


We will regularly post updates on the rollout of the vaccination programme on our news page here.


Some vaccination sites are offering drop-in clinics for COVID-19 vaccines. We will share details here when we’re aware of them (further dates are coming soon).

Please note you must wear a mask when you attend any vaccination site.

Drop-in Clinics

Where Date Open to
Gloucestershire Royal Hospital JabVan (see map here) 30 January-26 February, open Tuesday to Saturday:

Tuesdays 11.30am-5pm
Wednesday to Saturday 9am-3.30pm

Exceptions – 11 and 25 Feb (see separate rows below)

Anyone 12+ eligible for an autumn booster.

Anyone 12+ eligible for a first of second dose

Please note these are also booked clinics, but they are able to accept walk-ins, just be prepared to queue.

If an appointment is more convenient, you can book via the National Booking System nhs.uk/covidvaccination

The Cavern, Westgate Street, Gloucester, GL1 2NF Tuesday 31 January 2023 10am-2pm Autumn boosters only for those aged 12+
Flu vaccine may be available for those eligible 12+
Cheltenham East Fire Station Thursday 2 February 16:30-18:45 Anyone over the age of 5 eligible for a first, second or autumn booster dose
Gloucester City Homes – Oliver Close, Tuffley, GL4 0HD Monday 6 February 2023 10am-2pm Autumn boosters only for those aged 12+
Flu vaccine may be available for those eligible 12+
Cashes Green Community Centre, Queen’s Drive, Stroud, GL5 4NR Wednesday 8 February 2023 10am-2.30pm Autumn boosters only for those aged 12+
Flu vaccine may be available for those eligible 12+
Cheltenham East Fire Station Thursday 9 February 16:30-18:45 Anyone over the age of 5 eligible for a first, second or autumn booster dose
Gloucestershire Royal Hospital JabVan (see map here) Saturday 11 February 9am-1.30pm 5-11 year olds (incl. 12 year olds in year 7) for first, second or if eligible booster doses.

Please note these are also booked clinics, but they are able to accept walk-ins, just be prepared to queue.

If an appointment is more convenient, you can book via the National Booking System nhs.uk/covidvaccination

Gloucestershire Royal Hospital JabVan (see map here) Saturday 11 February 2pm-4pm Anyone 12+ eligible for an autumn booster.

Anyone 12+ eligible for a first of second dose

Please note these are also booked clinics, but they are able to accept walk-ins, just be prepared to queue.

If an appointment is more convenient, you can book via the National Booking System nhs.uk/covidvaccination

Rosebank Surgery, Gloucester Saturday 11 February 2.30pm-6pm Anyone 12+ eligible for an autumn booster.

Anyone 12+ eligible for a first of second dose

St Paul’s Hub, St Paul’s Walk, Cheltenham, GL50 4GG Tuesday 14 February 2023 10am-3pm Autumn boosters only for those aged 12+
Flu vaccine may be available for those eligible 12+
Cheltenham East Fire Station Thursday 16 February 16:30-18:45 Anyone over the age of 5 eligible for a first, second or autumn booster dose
Cheltenham East Fire Station Thursday 23 February 16:30-18:45 Anyone over the age of 5 eligible for a first, second or autumn booster dose
Gloucestershire Royal Hospital JabVan (see map here) Saturday 25 February 9am-1.30pm 5-11 year olds (incl. 12 year olds in year 7) for first, second or if eligible booster doses.

Please note these are also booked clinics, but they are able to accept walk-ins, just be prepared to queue.

If an appointment is more convenient, you can book via the National Booking System nhs.uk/covidvaccination

Gloucestershire Royal Hospital JabVan (see map here) Saturday 11 February 2pm-4pm Anyone 12+ eligible for an autumn booster.

Anyone 12+ eligible for a first of second dose

Please note these are also booked clinics, but they are able to accept walk-ins, just be prepared to queue.

If an appointment is more convenient, you can book via the National Booking System nhs.uk/covidvaccination

People should not attend the drop-in service if:

  • they have already made an appointment at a vaccination centre in the county
  • they have symptoms of COVID-19 or have had a positive COVID-19 test within the last 4 weeks (people aged over 18) or 12 weeks (children under the age of 18)

There are three ways for adults to access a COVID vaccine in Gloucestershire:

  • Via appointment at a GP-led primary care network vaccination centre – The bulk of vaccinations continue to be provided by appointment through the 11 GP primary care network community vaccination centres across the county. Please note that these appointments are not available on the national booking system (NBS), people will receive an invite directly from local NHS services to book when it’s their turn. They do not need to contact their GP Practice to get an appointment.
  • Via the national booking system (NBS) – some people may choose to book an appointment at one of 8 community pharmacies or the new Jab Van at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital using the NBS telephone number and website (www.nhs.uk/covidvaccination or call 119).
  • At a drop-in clinic. Dates (including any new ones) and any changes to eligibility for future drop-in sessions will be available further up this page. People can also keep up to date through CCG (@GlosCCG) and GP Practice social media channels for up to date information on who is eligible to attend each clinic.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) recommended that a further dose of the COVID-19 vaccine should be offered to:

  • residents in a care home for older adults and staff working in care homes for older adults
  • frontline health and social care workers
  • all adults aged 50 years and over
  • people aged 5 to 49 years with certain health conditions
  • persons aged 5 to 49 years who are household contacts of people with a severely weakened immune system
  • people who receive a carer’s allowance, or are the main carer for an older or disabled person who may be at risk if you get sick
  • pregnant women


COVID-19 vaccines and the flu vaccine can be given on the same day and for people that are eligible for both, there may be opportunities to have both together. We would encourage you to get your vaccinations as soon as possible and get fully protected rather than waiting as it may not always be possible to get them together.

Yes, if you are eligible to receive these two vaccines, you may be offered both in the same appointment. It is safe to receive both vaccines in the same appointment. But it’s important that you do not wait to try and schedule both vaccinations at the same time as this may not be possible and could delay your protection over winter. Please take up the offer of each vaccine when you are invited to, even if they are on different dates.

More than 94% of England’s population have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine – saving lives, helping tens of thousands to stay out of hospital, and enabling us to return to lives we knew before the pandemic began.

However, the virus is still with us and is still making people very ill.

The JCVI has stated that winter will remain the season when the threat from COVID-19 is greatest for individuals and communities. Viruses, like COVID-19, spread much more easily in winter when we socialise indoors, so it’s important that everyone eligible tops up their protection with an autumn booster.

The aim is to protect the whole population and protect those at greatest risk from the virus against severe COVID-19 disease over winter.

The COVID-19 vaccination will reduce the chance of you suffering from COVID-19.

The COVID-19 vaccines have saved more than 100,000 lives and significantly reduced hospitalisations from COVID-19. The COVID-19 vaccination programme allows us to live with this virus without restrictions on our freedoms.

With both flu and COVID-19 expected to be circulating this winter, it’s important to boost your immunity and help protect yourself and others.

The COVID-19 vaccination will reduce the chance of you suffering from COVID-19 disease. It may take a few days for your body to build up some protection from the booster.

Like all medicines, no vaccine is 100% guarantee of not catching the virus – some people may still get COVID-19 despite getting vaccinated but this should be less severe.

As with any medicine, vaccines are highly regulated products. There are checks at every stage in the development and manufacturing process, and continued monitoring once it has been authorised and is being used in the wider population.

Each of the vaccines are tested on tens of thousands of people across the world. They are tested on both men and women, on people from different ethnic backgrounds, and of all age groups.

Latest data from UKHSA show that six months after receiving a second dose, two doses provide between 55% and 70% protection from needing to be hospitalised for Covid-19. This remains around 70% six months after receiving the booster.

The NHS will prioritise protection of those at greatest risk – starting with people in the older age groups or who are clinically more vulnerable, and then inviting people in the other eligible groups. You will receive a letter, email or text from the NHS when it is your turn to come forward.

On 15 August 2022, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) granted regulatory approval for the Moderna bivalent COVID-19 vaccine. After reviewing data on booster responses from different combinations of COVID-19 vaccines, the UK, following JCVI advice, will deploy vaccines which are targeted at both Omicron and the original strain of COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines which target two different variants of COVID-19 are called bivalent vaccines. Bivalent vaccines broaden immunity and therefore potentially improve protection against variants of COVID-19. All vaccines used in the UK to date have been primarily targeted at the original strain of COVID-19 and have remained effective at preventing severe disease against subsequent variants.

All vaccines used in the UK must be authorised by our independent medicines’ regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Each COVID-19 vaccine candidate is assessed by teams of scientists and clinicians on a case-by-case basis and is only authorised once it has met robust standards of effectiveness, safety and quality set by MHRA. The MHRA has reviewed the available safety and efficacy data supporting Moderna’s bivalent vaccine and provided its authorisation.

Common side effects are the same for all COVID-19 vaccines used in the UK, and include:
• having a painful, heavy feeling and tenderness in the arm where you had your injection. This tends to be worst around a day or two following the vaccination
• feeling tired
• headache
• general aches, or mild flu like symptoms

You can rest and take paracetamol (follow the dose advice in the packaging) to help make you feel better. Although feeling feverish is not uncommon for 2 to 3 days, a high temperature is unusual and may indicate you have COVID-19 or another infection.

Although a fever can occur within a day or two of vaccination, if you have any other COVID-19 symptoms or your fever lasts longer, stay at home. Symptoms following vaccination normally last less than a week. If your symptoms seem to get worse or if you are concerned, you can call NHS 111.

Worldwide, there have been very rare cases of inflammation of the heart called myocarditis or pericarditis reported after some vaccinations. These cases have been seen mostly in younger men within several days after vaccination. Most of these people recovered and felt better following rest and simple treatments.
You should seek medical advice urgently if, after vaccination, you experience:
• chest pain
• shortness of breath
• feelings of having a fast-beating, fluttering, or pounding heart

If you are feeling unwell, for instance if you have a fever or have recently had a fever, it is better to leave a seven day interval between the start of your symptoms began to when you have your vaccine. You should not attend a vaccine appointment if you are self-isolating or waiting for a COVID-19 test.

If you are unwell on the day of vaccination for whatever reason, it may be appropriate to postpone vaccination until you have recovered. Those people with long term illness should present for vaccination when invited. If you are uncertain, please attend the vaccination service where healthcare professionals will be available who can advise you.

No, the JCVI advises that the booster vaccine should be offered no earlier than three months after completion of the primary vaccine course.

Everyone who is eligible that hasn’t already had their first or second COVID-19 vaccination will still be able to get vaccinated, even when the COVID-19 autumn booster programme begins.

If you’ve recently had a confirmed COVID-19 infection, you should ideally wait before getting any dose of the vaccine. You should ideally wait:

• 4 weeks (28 days) if you’re aged 18 years old or over
• 12 weeks (84 days) if you’re aged 5 to 17 years
• 4 weeks (28 days) if you’re aged 12 to 17 years old and at high-risk from COVID-19
This starts from the date your symptoms started or from the date of a positive test, whichever was earlier. If you had some symptoms but you are not sure if you had COVID-19, you should still attend for vaccination once your symptoms are better and you can discuss this with a healthcare professional when you attend.

No, all COVID-19 vaccines authorised for use in the deployment programme are highly effective and provide a strong booster response. When you attend your appointment, the NHS will offer you a safe, effective vaccine.

If you’re currently housebound and you think you’re eligible for a home vaccination, but you have not been contacted by the NHS to arrange this, contact your GP practice for support.

For the 2022 autumn booster programme, the primary objective is to boost immunity in those at higher risk from severe COVID-19 illness so that those people have optimal protection against severe COVID-19. In particular, the vaccine will help avoid those people being hospitalised or dying from COVID-19 over winter 2022/23. Throughout the pandemic, COVID-19 mortality has disproportionately affected those in older age groups, residents in care homes for older adults, and those with certain underlying health conditions, particularly those who are severely immunosuppressed. Following vaccination, these same factors continue to identify those people who are at higher risk of developing severe COVID-19.

Yes. The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) confirm that pregnant women are advised to get the vaccination where possible as they are at a higher risk from COVID-19, especially in the 3rd trimester.

The vast majority of pregnant women who become seriously ill with COVID-19 are unvaccinated, so it’s really important to have both doses of your vaccine to protect you and your baby.

Thousands of pregnant women have been safely vaccinated across the UK and worldwide and there is no current evidence of any serious side effects for pregnant women who have had the vaccination.

You can read the guidance from JCVI here.

The NHS has lots of information available to help you make a decision about whether to have a vaccination during pregnancy. You can also talk things through with a healthcare professional before you make a decision, whether that’s your GP or midwife, they’d be happy to talk through the risks and benefits with you.

Five reasons to get the COVID-19 vaccine if you’re pregnant

A leaflet for women who are currently pregnant or breastfeeding

Local GP, Dr Jeremy Welch, joined the Gloucestershire Maternity Voices Partnership on a Facebook Live to answer questions about having the jab while pregnant.

In most cases, no. Supply and availability of vaccines will be a key factor.

Any vaccines that the NHS provide will have been approved because they pass the MHRA’s tests on safety and efficacy, so people should be assured that whatever vaccine they get it will offer a high degree of protection.


If you don’t drive, or don’t have a family member, friend or neighbour who can take you to your local vaccine centre, the Community Wellbeing Service may be able to help you.  If you contact your local service they will be able to discuss the options with you and put you in touch with someone who can help.  Please note there is likely to be a charge for any transport provided.


People with history of a severe allergy to the ingredients of the vaccines should not be vaccinated.

The MHRA have updated their guidance to say that pregnant women and those who are breastfeeding can have the vaccine but should discuss it with a clinician to ensure that the benefits outweigh any potential risks.


Dr Gayatri Amirthalingam is a consultant in the National Immunisation team at Public Health England. In this video she explains that there are no concerns about the COVID-19 vaccines affecting present or future fertility, providing important reassurance.


Yes, they should get vaccinated. There is no evidence of any safety concerns from vaccinating individuals with a past history of COVID-19 infection, or with detectable COVID-19 antibody, so people who have had COVID-19 disease (whether confirmed or suspected) can still receive the COVID-19 vaccine when it is their time to do so.

First and second doses of COVID-19

There are a number of patient resources available. Several of these leaflets are available in multiple languages, just click on the link which takes you through to relevant page of the gov.uk website.

A guide for older adults
Resources for children and young people
A guide to COVID vaccinations – Easy Read
Invite letter – Easy Read
What to expect after your vaccination
What to expect after your vaccination – Easy Read
Why am I being asked to wait?
Women of childbearing age, those currently pregnant or breastfeeding
Vaccinations in pregnancy
A guide for women currently pregnant or breastfeeding – Easy Read
Vaccination guides in British Sign Language 
Information for Healthcare Workers
A guide for social care staff

The Inclusion Gloucestershire website has lots of useful resources, including easy read guides and information about reasonable adjustments for people with severe learning disabilities. Visit the site here.

COVID-19 Booster

A guide to booster vaccination

Information in other languages 

We are working with healthcare professionals and others in the community to produce translations of important vaccination information into other languages. Find these resources here.


Organisations play a vital role in helping to promote a positive vaccination message to make sure workplaces are safe. Only through collective effort, will we help people to make well informed decisions and encourage as many people as possible to get the Covid-19 vaccine.

The COVID-19 vaccination is our best chance of protecting ourselves from the most severe symptoms of COVID-19 and getting back to normal, so we are urging employers to support their staff in getting the vaccine. There are benefits for everyone; if people are protected from COVID-19 the risk of cases and outbreaks and therefore workplace absence is reduced. In supporting business and society to get back to normal, we will hopefully avoid any more years like the one we’ve all just been through.

We have developed some resources which we hope will help you understand your role in the COVID-19 vaccination programme, and information to make it as easy as possible for you to share accurate information with your staff about how and why they should take up the offer of a vaccination.


For more information on the national COVID-19 vaccination programme and priority groups, you may find the following links useful: